RGBY systems are a game-changing addition to KVANT's product lines.

RGBY labelled systems come with an extra OPSL module inside - the one that outputs 577nm yellow laser. And although it may seem just like an ordinary upgrade by one additional colour, it is a major improvement which offers three significant advantages over most conventional RGB lasers.

Current RGBY models: Atom 14 HPS RGBY | LD 33 Atom RGBY | Spectrum 25 RGBY | Spectrum 33 RGBY | LD 25 Spectrum RGBY and LD 33 Spectrum RGBY.

 

Total Luminosity

The most apparent difference in having the yellow laser added to the system is the total amount of luminosity the projector can generate, and that means brightness.

LD 25 Spectrum RGBY white beams

Having an extra 5 Watts of 577nm OPS yellow laser in our Atom and Spectrum laser projectors increases their total luminosity by 80 to 110%, depending on the model. And that's a huge difference! It makes some of the models more than twice as bright and visible.
 

High brightness Kvant lasers
LD 25 Spectrum RGBY system in action, observed from 2km distance. LEFT: 5W/577nm module is OFF. RIGHT: 5W/577nm module is ON.

 

Theory and Reality

577nm OPSL yellow laser human eye sensitivity

The 577nm wavelength is very close to the peak of human eye sensitivity.
So unlike, let's say, 445nm blue laser, which doesn't add much to the overall brightness of the system, the yellow laser adds more to it than most other colours.

We did a laboratory trial test for different temperatures of white-colour, using the method with the integrated chromatic sphere.

At 8000 Kelvin white-colour, which is white with a blue tint (so-called cold white), the increase in total luminosity between standard Spectrum 30 (30W RGB) and Spectrum 33 RGBY system was enormous 80%. 

As the white shifts to warmer segment, the difference is even more significant. From about 6000 Kelvin it resulted in a 110% increase.

 

What's that in Watts?

When we measured the optical power output in Watts for the same as above, it resulted in the following:

With the standard 30W RGB system we could utilise the maximum of 15.9 Watts of its available output while keeping the white at 6500 Kelvin. With Spectrum 33 RGBY outputting the same white, we were able to use as much as 27.9 Watts of its 33 Watts.

So here is scientifically proved, that our RGBY projector visually outperforms any conventional RGB laser system of the same or even much higher power output.

RGBY laser luminosity increase LD Spectrum

Apart from other colours, the 577nm yellow laser massively increases brightness and visibility of the white light beam, while at the same time, it doesn't change its appearance too much. It only gives it that hint of gold, which makes it beautiful and lively.

Furthermore, the addition of the yellow laser in KVANT laser display systems significantly increases the Colour Rendering Index (CRI) from 30 (RGB) to 75 (RGBY), making it the best choice for most laser graphics and laser mapping applications.
CRI is used to represent how well a light source renders the colours of objects that it illuminates.

 

100% yellow laser = OPSL yellow

Another distinct advantage of our RGBY systems is, of course, that perfect yellow.

To get a perfect yellow from standard RGB system, both red and green beams must be 100% matching each other in shape, size and divergence. They also must be spot-on aligned, so they overlap each other along their journey. In real life, this is, unfortunately, impossible.

Red and green laser yellow

Any inconsistency in any of the mentioned conditions results in a red or green halo around the yellow beam.

The yellow beam coming out of the RGBY system is pure, without any discolourations around it or at the projection surface, making the projections brighter and crispier.

The difference between mixed yellow and single OPSL yellow is easily recognisable, and every laser display professional can tell the difference straight away.
 

OPSL 577nm yellow vs RG yellow laser
The 577nm OPS laser beam on the LEFT is clean and pure and without any discolouration.

 

Extensive range of those beautiful colours

Last but not least is the difference in the range of colours and their intensity that the addition of 577nm yellow offers.

It is pretty normal that in a standard RGB laser system, the number of colours in the yellow-orange range is somehow limited. Being able to use pure yellow when creating such colours allows for a significantly broader range of more vivid colours.

 

Low Divergence option!

Most Kvant RGBY systems are available in two different versions, where the low divergence derivative called LD - RGBY offers unparalleled visual intensity on long-distance projections.

Check out our LD Atom and LD Spectrum systems if you are after brightest lasers currently available.

And remember, that our LD 33 Spectrum RGBY beast can easily beat any conventional quality full-colour RGB laser with the output of up to about 80W.
 

KVANT LD 33 Spectrum RGBY used for laser mapping
Laser mapping with KVANT LD 33 Spectrum RGBY laser display system. That was truly one amazing night of fun we had!